ARE WE EUROPE
ARE WE EUROPE

#7 FOOD

Fields for Food

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Wide, open landscapes, rolling endlessly before our eyes. They are sights that we have come to love, but photographer Bernd Walz hopes to open our eyes to how unnatural they actually are. “In our western world, natural landscapes are shrinking”, he explains, “land used by industrial agriculture creates vast landscapes devoid of their natural biodiversity”. It radically changes how we perceive the world around us. Rather than seeing the landscapes that are natural to the area, we have become accustomed to appreciating the odd aesthetics of a field transformed by extensive agriculture. What we are witnessing is not nature, but the remnants of our own food production cycle: the landscape deformed by human intervention.

Walz, himself a professor in zoology and physiology at the universities of Heidelberg, Ulm, Regensburg and Potsdam, manages to look at these landscapes from a scientific perspective, which adds a whole new dimension to his photographic endeavours. Together with his wife - also a professor in the natural sciences - he has found the sweet spot between the scientific and the artistic eye.

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Land used by industrial agriculture creates vast landscapes devoid of their natural biodiversity.
— Bernd Walz
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Rather than seeing the landscapes that are natural to the area, we have become accustomed to appreciating the odd aesthetics of a field transformed by extensive agriculture.
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Bernd Walz